Workout Of The Month: 6 Great Kettlebell Warm-Ups

Workout Of The Month: 6 Great Kettlebell Warm-Ups

Kettlebells are an essential workout tool today, and are super versatile. They’re easy to use for in-home or gym workouts and can be used to perform anything from normal barbell and dumbbell exercises to kettlebell specific movements.

The kettlebell can help you improve your strength, muscle mass, power, and explosiveness, all while working on your cardio as well. If you are looking for an all-around simple and safe workout, chances are the kettlebell is your best choice.

Below is a guide put together by our friends at Stack.com. It includes six kettlebell warm-ups — two for each range of difficulty. Feel free to start at whichever level feels most comfortable to you.

 

WKT of the Month 2.15

Beginner:

Start with 10-, 20-, and 30-pound kettlebells for females, and 20-, 30-, and 40-pound kettlebells for males. These circuits should be a general warm-up with a total body focus and they’re ideal before strength training, conditioning, speed training, or plyometrics.

Circuit 1 (perform each exercise for 30 seconds, repeat 2-3 times):

  1. Jump Rope
  2. Two-Handed Kettlebell Swings
  3. Lunges
  4. Inchworms
  5. Bear Crawls
  6. Push-ups
  7. Plank
  8. Reverse Crunches

Circuit 2 (perform each exercise for 30 seconds, repeat 2-3 times):

  1. Jump Rope
  2. Two-Handed Kettlebell Swings
  3. Goblet Squats
  4. Reverse Lunges
  5. One-Legged Hip Hinges (each leg)
  6. Medicine Ball Chest Pass

 

WKt of the Month Story

Intermediate:

Start with 15-, 25-, and 35-pound kettlebells for females, and 20-, 35-, and 50-pound kettlebells for males.

Circuit 1:

  1. Jump Rope
  2. Two-Handed Kettlebell Swings
  3. Lunges (kettlebell held overhead, do 30 seconds on each side)
  4. One-Legged Hip Hinges (each leg, bodyweight only)
  5. Push-Ups
  6. Bear Crawls
  7. Heavy Rope Slams
  8. Plank

Circuit 2:

  1. Jump Rope
  2. One-Handed Kettlebell Swings (do 30 seconds with each hand)
  3. Kettlebell Deadlifts
  4. Inchworms
  5. Sled Push
  6. Sled Pull
  7. Plank

 

Kettlebell

Advanced:

Start with 20-, 35-, and 50-pound kettlebells for females, and 30-, 45-, and 60-pounders for males.

Circuit 1:

  1. Jump Rope
  2. One-Handed Kettlebell Swings + Kettlebell Cleans (30 seconds swing, 30 seconds clean, train each hand)
  3. One-Legged Hip Hinges (each leg, bodyweight only)
  4. Kettlebell Windmills (30 seconds on each side)
  5. Bear Crawls

Circuit 2:

  1. Jump Rope
  2. One-Handed Kettlebell Swings + Kettlebell Snatches (30 seconds swing, 30 seconds snatch, train each hand)
  3. Kettlebell Get-Ups (30 seconds each hand)
  4. Lunges
  5. Inchworms
Workout of the Month: Speed Ladder Drills

Workout of the Month: Speed Ladder Drills

January Workout of the Month

You can have all of the speed in the world, but if you can’t cut, pivot, stop, or change directions on a dime, that speed won’t do you any good.

This is why as an athlete, continuously working to improve your agility, coordination, and balance is key. That is where speed ladders come in. And thanks to our partners at Stack.com, we have come up with four agility speed ladder drills to help you take your game to the next level.

For optimum performance, these drills should be done together after a dynamic warm-up one to two days a week.

Lateral Shuffle

Stand with the ladder to your left. Shuffle laterally through ladder, placing one foot in each box so that both feet are never in the same box at the same time. Repeat in opposite direction.

Lateral Change-of-Direction Shuffle

Stand with the ladder to your left. Using the same technique described above, shuffle to your left for two boxes, then step towards start for one box. Continue this pattern through entire ladder. Repeat in opposite direction. When you feel you’ve mastered the technique, try varying the number of boxes you shuffle.

Quarter Turns

Stand facing the ladder with your left foot in the first box and right foot to the right of that same box. Hop and rotate 90 degrees counterclockwise, so your right foot is in second box and left foot is still in the first box. Hop back to the starting stance, only now your left foot should be in the second box with your right foot outside. Continue this pattern through the entire ladder, then repeat in the opposite direction.

Quarter Turn T-Drill

Stand facing the ladder with your left foot in the first box and right foot to the right of the box. Hop and rotate 90 degrees clockwise, so your right foot is in the first box and left foot is in second box. Hop back to the starting stance, with your left foot now in the second box and right foot outside of second box. Continue pattern through entire ladder, and repeat in opposite direction. For an additional challenge, hold a medicine ball throughout the drill.


For more workout tips, check out last month’s Workout of the Month post that covered kneeling exercises.

Workout Of The Month: Kneeling Exercises

Workout Of The Month: Kneeling Exercises

12 Workout Of The Month 1

Walk into a gym and you’ll notice a lot of the same thing: people standing, sitting, or lying on their backs while they are lifting weights or exercising.

Even though these get the job done, there is another position that can help strengthen your body and balance. Kneeling.

Yes, kneeling.

Not only is this position a change up from your regular bench press, curls, or squats, but it most importantly can improve your balance, strength, and core stability.

Thanks to our friends at stack.com we can help you work some of these exercises into your regular routine. Here are six of our favorite kneeling exercises for you to pick and choose from:

 

1. Ball Chops:

  • Kneeling on your left knee with the right leg in a lunge position, hold the med ball overhead.
  • Drive the ball across your body diagonally toward the right hip and simultaneously rotate right.
  • Slowly return to start position and repeat nine more times. Immediately switch kneeling positions and do 10 Ball Chops.

 

2. Upright Rows:

  • Kneeling on both knees in an upright position, hold two dumbbells with a pronated grip (Hands facing away from the body) near your thighs and pull them up to chest level.
  • Hold for one second and slowly return to start, repeating nine more times.

 

3. Knee Elevated Ball Rollouts:

  • Start by placing both hands atop an exercise ball while kneeling on both knees.
  • Raise the right knee and roll the ball forward extending your arms and roll it back, continuing for 10 reps.
  • Without stopping, repeat with the left knee airborne.

 

4. Bird Dogs:

  • Begin by kneeling on both knees with your hands spaced shoulder-width apart on a soft surface.
  • Looking straight ahead lift your right knee and extend the leg back while at the same time raising your left hand and extending your arm forward at shoulder level.
  • Focus on an object ahead of you to maintain balance and hold the position 10 seconds.
  • Repeat with the left knee/leg airborne and the right hand/arm extended. Continue alternating 10 times.

 

5. Dumbbell Rows:

  • Begin in a push-up position on both knees with a dumbbell at your right side.
  • Elevate your right knee and pull the dumbbell up with your right hand to your waist and pause while squeezing your shoulder blades together.
  • Slowly lower and do nine more reps.
  • After 10 reps, repeat by raising your left knee and pulling the dumbbell up with your left hand.

 

6. Knee-Elevated Ball Push-ups:

  • Kneel on both knees with your hands atop a med ball in a modified push-up position.
  • Lift the right knee and perform 10 push-ups.
  • Switch and raise the left knee and do another 10 push-ups.

Looking to get faster? Check out last month’s Speed Building post — and make sure to check the Eastbay blog on January 15 for our next post in the series.

Workout Of The Month: Speed Building

Workout Of The Month: Speed Building

This is the first part of our new Workout Of The Month blog series where Eastbay will give you cutting-edge workout tips, sure to take your game to the next level.

11.15 WKT of the Month 2

Ask any athlete what they wish they had more of and nine times out of ten the word “speed” comes up.

Whether it comes in the first step, over a distance, or laterally — it’s all valuable. Whatever edge you can get speed wise over your opponent you should take.

This is where we come in to help, thanks to some speed training workouts from our partners at STACK.com.

Stride Length Training Drill: Forward Bounding

This drill is designed to help you improve the distance you cover between strides. Do four sets of 30 yards:

  1. Place two cones 30 yards apart.
  2. Line up at the first cone, and with force stride lengthily for 30 yards.
  3. Focus on extending your back leg out as you alternate steps.
  4. Only contact the ground with the balls of your feet.