Ask An IMG Trainer: Great At-Home Workout Ideas

Ask An IMG Trainer: Great At-Home Workout Ideas

We’ve all experienced a canceled practice or workout session whether it’s because of nasty weather outside, staff being out of town, construction at the facilities…. Whatever, it happens, but it doesn’t mean it’s an excuse for you to give in and skip training. The best athletes know that what sets them apart from the rest is their dedication to remaining fit and prepared regardless of their circumstances.

For this ‘Ask An IMG Trainer’ blog post, we decided to chat with Victoria Druehl, a Physical Conditioning Coach at IMG Academy in order to help you find ways to workout at home.

A man wearing does a plank on a yoga mat.

Workout Types

  1. Circuit Style: Pick five to six of your favorite exercises listed below and do a set of each with minimal rest between. After you make it through the circuit, take a rest before doing the exercises again three or four more times.
  2. Interval Style: Pick an exercise, for example: goblet squats, and do as many as you can for 20 seconds. After your set you then rest for 10 seconds and repeat eight times. Then, rest for two minutes, pick a new exercise and repeat.
  3. Superset Style: Pick lower body and upper body exercises or lower body and core exercises and do sets of them directly after each other without rest. After you finish the superset, rest for one to two minutes.

Below are some workouts you can do in circuit, interval, or superset styles with little or no equipment.

Upper Body

  • Pushups: multiple variations and grips
  • Arm circles/arm pulls
  • Dips

Core

  • Planks: multiple variations
  • Mountain climbers
  • Dead bug: on your back alternate moving side to side and raising your leg to your hand
  • Sit ups
  • Crunches
  • Scissor kicks
  • Toe touches

Lower Body

  • Body weight squats
  • Lunges
  • Glute bridges
  • Lateral squats
  • Lateral lunges
  • Wall sits

So mix and match away! Staying inside and working out in the privacy of your own home can truly be fun, and when practice starts up again, you’ll be glad you didn’t slack off on your training.

Winter Wear: This Year’s Cold Weather Style Guide

Winter Wear: This Year’s Cold Weather Style Guide

By now, summer seems like a distant memory. Outside the temperatures are cooling off and reminding you that Christmas break is only a few weeks away! But as menacing as the cold weather gets, you can’t hibernate all winter long, and when you head outside to hang with friends and take a new winter profile pic you’ll want to make sure you’re prepared with winter wear. That’s why we’ve put together looks for men and women featuring this year’s best cold weather styles so that no matter how bad the wind, rain, or snow, you can keep cozy.

A Look Back: All Conditions Gear

A Look Back: All Conditions Gear

January is one of the coldest, darkest times of the year in most parts of the U.S. The wind is biting, the snow is deep, and it feels like summer will never return again. In the mid-90s, Nike had a remedy for the bone-chilling temps and less-than-favorable traction: All Conditions Gear. Eastbay catalogs were chock full of hiking boots, trail shoes, Dri-FIT shirts, Therma-FIT pants, and Clima-FIT jackets that kept the body dry and comfortable no matter how hard the snow and sleet came down. One of the people responsible for a lot of what we saw and wore in the ’90s was designer Michael Hernandez. I had the opportunity to ask him a few questions about what it was like to be part of a team that was setting the standard for outdoor apparel and functional innovative technologies.

Eastbay Outdoors Intro Page

Drew: What was your role with Nike back in the ’90s?

Michael: I was hired by Nike in 1991. During the ’90s, I held several different positions ranging from Product Graphic Designer, Art Director, Design Director and Senior Designer. I contributed on many of Nike’s sport categories during this time including Sports Graphics, Sports Marketing, Jordan, Retail (Niketown), Running, and many Special Projects. I’m a huge fan of product and brand working together to conceive and create compelling products and stories that resonate with the consumer. Product designers often find that their stories and inspiration never make it to the consumer. I was very motivated to work in collaboration with other designers and marketers with the end in mind, delivering our product with stories that inspired athletes, retailers, and consumers.

Nike Outdoors shoes

Drew: Can you tell me about the ACG logo we see on all the gear?

Michael: One of the Nike categories I worked extensively on was All Conditions Gear (ACG). ACG had been around for years and was known mostly for the innovative outdoor footwear. The outdoor marketplace was catering to more of a traditional outdoor consumer who wore a lot of brown shoes. ACG really started to push into new territories with product by innovating. Footwear started to become much more youthful and performance-driven, and the aesthetics started to be informed by trends happening in the marketplace. Consumers were migrating to products that embraced color and new materials. Snowboarding was really pushing outerwear in fun and interesting directions and ACG’s consumer was shifting.

Another brand designer and I were asked to rebrand the ACG logo. We designed for months and presented our own ideas. They choose my design and adopted a new brand direction that was more youthful, performance-driven, and modern. The new branding supported other product categories ACG was building market share in, which included mountain biking, snowboarding, and water sports. The new logo signaled that the brand was less of a granola-eating, tree-hugging product line. ACG was heading down new paths and needed to evolve to a younger mindset.

Eastbay Outdoor Boots

Drew: What was your favorite design/shoe/apparel?

Michael: That would be the Trek Mountain Bike Team uniform. ACG sponsored the Trek Mountain Bike Team and I designed a wide range of garments with sublimated graphics that the team used to train and compete in. The jersey was in tune with the new ACG logo with its streamlined, bold, and simple aesthetic. Nike had been in the cycling business prior to ACG but began investing more into competitive biking, which eventually led to Nike sponsoring the U.S. Postal Service Cycling team.

Eastbay Outdoors apparel

Drew:  A lot of the footwear had interesting names – was there any particular model that had a great story behind it?

Michael: You’re so right – ACG was known for its creative footwear names like Nike Air Rivaderchi, Pocket Knife, and Air Moc (Potato Shoe) to name just a few. I would have to say that the Air Mowabb was the shoe design that leaves the most influence over time for so many reasons. My 23 years at Nike were filled with some amazing experiences. But, most of all, I worked with so many talented people that made the most impact on my design career. I reported to Tinker Hatfield for years, working on his team and learning footwear design. I remember Tinker’s inspiration boards for the Air Mowabb. He drew everything by hand, including the logo that had a lot of personality. His ability to tell a story through his outdoor experiences (Mowabb, Utah) and design skills was impressive to say the least. The original Air Mowabb colors and material story were very fresh then and hold up to this day. This design was deemed more of an outdoor “sneaker.” ACG was leading the outdoor industry by walking away from traditional hiking designs, and running in new directions.

Nike outdoors shoes 2

Drew: There were many innovative technologies being introduced rather quickly, such as Dri-FIT, Therma-FIT, and Clima-FIT. Did you play a role in developing any of these fabrics, and if so, which was your favorite?

Michael: Yes, the Nike-FIT system of fabric technologies were being used across the Nike categories. Dri-FIT was being used in Team Sports as a first layer that far exceeded the benefits of cotton undergarments. Nike-FIT got a real boost when it was promoted through advertising and launched a new branding scheme that I was responsible for designing. I redesigned the Nike-FIT branding marks and created a menu of product trim application to marry up with the fabrics. The trim applications menu included molded patches, woven labels, reflective labels, heat transfers, and screenprints.

The benefits of Nike-FIT were also communicated with informative technical illustrations that we applied to a new Nike-FIT hangtag system and sublimated interior label packages. The new system was not confined to just apparel – footwear leveraged the fabric technologies as well. The ACG and Running categories implemented this system the deepest. The benefits of appropriate apparel layering came to a head when we educated consumers on why layering correctly improved personal performance and comfort.

Nike Outdoor-FIT apparel

Drew: What are you working on currently, and can you share a little bit about The Bruin Co.?

Michael: I started up my design and marketing consultancy, The Bruin Co. five years ago. I’ve designed footwear and other products, though the lion’s share of projects are focused on branding. I have branded and rebranded many clients’ businesses with a focus on elevating their brand and getting more strategic about how they tell their stories and focus on their consumers with more purpose.

My last role at Nike was Global Brand Creative Director. I spent a decade at Nike focused on brand design, gaining valuable experience creating and implementing seasonal global directives that included applications for Product, Retail and Digital. I also worked on content creation that included TV broadcast and web/viral content. Thanks for the opportunity to share some of my design experiences. Design is more than a slogan. You can just do it or go big or go home. Either way it’s all about the small details. The Bruin Co. is located in Salem, Oregon. Find us at www.TheBruinCo.com and on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/bruinstudio/?hl=en

Nike Outdoors full spread