Nike Air Max NM – Metallic Silver/New Green

Nike Air Max NM – Metallic Silver/New Green

words // Brandon Richard

In a theoretical world, had Japanese flamethrower Hideo Nomo swapped his 90-mph fastball for an extra 20 inches tacked onto his vertical, perhaps this new colorway of his Nike Air Max NM sig would have been a good fit for this past spring’s Nike Basketball “Easter Pack.” This shoe features a New Green mesh base with metallic silver leather overlays and black Swoosh branding on the side panels. The Air Max equipped midsole is done in white, with green working ‘eyelids’ over the windows, while a black rubber outsole provides the finishing touch below.

These Nike casual sneakers are available now at Eastbay.

Available: Nike Air Max NM – Metallic Silver/New Green

Nike Air Max NM Metallic Silver New Green 429749-003

Nike Air Max NM New Colorways

Nike Air Max NM New Colorways

words // Nick Engvall

Earlier this year we gave you word that one of the forgotten signature models from the ’90s would return. Although it doesn’t carry the same name as it once did, the tooling that it shares with the Griffey Max line makes it unmistakable.  More colorways of the shoe now known as the Nike Air Max NM have arrived just in time for baseball season.

The Max Air cushioning-equipped NM has been one of the few to never be released as a Retro, but now new colorways that pay tribute to its heritage have arrived. While the Tech Grey and Blue Spark colorway might be more accurate in depicting Dodger colors for the followers of this iconic shoe, a more memorable original colorway is now available as well. The Pro Blue colorway of the Nike Air Max NM is one which many who followed Nike Training in the ’90s should remember well since it was featured in the commercials back in the day. A third colorway is also available in a combination of black, white, grey and Varsity Red for those not wanting to wear the Dodger blue-inspired colorways.

Available now: Nike Air Max NM

Nike Air Max NM Tech Grey/Blue SparkNike Air Max NM Tech Grey/Blue SparkNike Air Max NM Tech Black/White/Varsity RedNike Air Max NM Tech Black/White/Varsity RedNike Air Max NM Tech Pro Blue/White/BlackNike Air Max NM Tech Pro Blue/White/BlackNike Air Max NM Tech Pro Blue/White/BlackNike Air Max NM Tech Pro Blue/White/BlackNike Air Max NM Tech Pro Blue/White/Black

Eastbay Memory Lane: Nike Air Max Nomo

Eastbay Memory Lane: Nike Air Max Nomo

words // Nick Engvall

In 1995, a Japanese pitcher named Hideo Nomo became the first Japanese-born player to play in the Major Leagues in over 30 years. Although his success in the Big Leagues was relatively short-lived, his impact was far beyond what any rookie of this day and age has had. Nomo’s first year with the Los Angeles Dodgers, which came after about five years of pitching in Japan, was his best. His windup and delivery was something that seemed more appropriately placed in a video game than in the real world and had the capability to make even the greatest of opposing batters look like they were back in Little League.

On top of baffling batters, Nomo’s windup wowed the fans even more so. For me, personally, Nomo’s Major League debut is something I will never forget. In May of 1995, he took to the mound against the San Francisco Giants. His delivery, in its tornado-like spiraling motion, was like a music conductor that day. For each and every pitch, the thousands of fans who had traveled just to see Hideo Nomo would ooh and aah. Each pitch began with a crescendo of  “ooh” in anticipation as Hideo spun almost completely backwards in his windup, and then simultaneously the crowd let out an “aah” of relief as he spun forward and threw to home plate. Even while cheering against his team, it was hard for me not to get into the whole spectacle, and I found myself  “oohing and aahing” right along with the rest of the audience. Especially with all the Japanese media in attendance, broadcasting the game back to Japan live, even with its 4:35 AM Tokyo start time, it was an unforgettable game. Nomo finished with seven strikeouts and allowed only one hit in the five innings he pitched.

After becoming the starting pitcher for the National League All Star team and winning the NL Rookie of the Year award in 1995, Nomo quickly grabbed an endorsement deal with Nike. His popularity in the United States seemed to only be surpassed by his popularity in Japan, and his Nike Baseball Commercials only fueled the fire for the Nike Air Max Nomo that was originally released in 1996. Nomo’s second season, which included the first of two no-hitters in his career, did the same.

The Air Max Nomo signature line was short lived, but over the years has become one of the most recognizable sneakers from Nike Training. This was in part due to the midsole tooling, which most will quickly relate to the Nike Air Griffey Max 1, but also because it never made a return as a Retro, thus adding to its allure.

Check out the images in this week’s Eastbay Memory Lane from the early 1997 Eastbay catalog.

Eastbay Memory Lane: Nike Air Max NomoEastbay Memory Lane: Nike Air Max NomoEastbay Memory Lane: Nike Air Max NomoEastbay Memory Lane: Nike Air Max Nomo

Eastbay Memory Lane: Nike Air Max Nomo

Eastbay Photo of the Week: Forgotten Signature?

words_Nick Engvall

In the mid-nineties Nike Training created a handful of unforgettable styles. Some of them short lived, some of them seem to live on through retro releases over and over again. When it comes to signature shoes, there seems to be two paths. The first being like Michael Jordan shoes, a long history of designs that repeatedly make an consistent impact on sneaker culture. The second is more like that of Penny Hardaway, Ken Griffey Jr. or Charles Barkley, a shorter life span in number of designs but filled with designs that were so influential that nearly everyone knows all of the models.

In the spring a signature model will return in retro form from a player that may not have had the impact when it came to signature shoes but on the field had more impact his rookie year than many rookies ever come close to. For fans of the game, this week’s Eastbay Photo of the Week might be too simple, but for some this relatively slept-on style might be completely new when it becomes available in March.

Whose signature shoe is it?

Eastbay Photo of the Week: Nike Air Max NM