From The Pros: The Five Tools You Need To Make It To The League

From The Pros: The Five Tools You Need To Make It To The League

Do you have big dreams of making it to the league one day? To some, that might sound like a longshot, but every pro football player started out right where you are now – playing the game they love and dreaming of turning it into something more. So we asked some of the game’s best what it takes to turn those dreams into reality. From the pros themselves, here are the five tools you need to make it to the league.

1. Accountability

If you’re going to set big goals for yourself, you have to be ready to make sacrifices and put in the work. Coaches, trainers, teammates, and parents can give you the tools and support to play your best, but the fire you need to overcome obstacles and make it to the top can only come from within.

“My biggest goal for this season is to push myself against competition and get better every day,” said 2021 Minnesota draft pick Kellen Mond. “I will always have a super high standard for myself and I want to be able to set the bar high in everything that I do. The best advice that I would give to another kid with dreams of making it to the league would be to be your biggest self-critic. Do not allow others to have a higher standard for you than yourself.”
 
“Coaches, people who are working with me and helping me succeed and accomplish my goals, they matter,” said Philly QB Jalen Hurts. “Their voices matter. But as a leader, I try to be a man who’s going to do my job. I hold myself to the highest standard possible. So anything anyone else says, it doesn’t mean much to me.”

2. Work Ethic

Being accountable to yourself first means that every new workout, practice, and scrimmage is a chance to run tighter routes, make cleaner catches, or hold coverage better than the athlete you were yesterday. In a game of inches, most of the important growth happens when no one’s watching. It’s incremental improvement over time that’s going to make all the difference on game day, whether you’re lining up at a JV scrimmage or a Division I State Championship.

 

“Don’t let anyone outwork you,” said Los Angeles safety Derwin James. “You can’t control how much natural talent you were born with, but you can control how hard you work. Be early to practice. Stay late. Make sure you’re getting extra work in in the weight room or watching film. That’s the only way to make it.”
“You see my success on Sunday,” said Green Bay lineman David Bakhtiari, “but the work that goes in is Monday through Saturday. It’s in the offseason where I really sharpen my iron, put myself in the best situation so when I do come back and play, I can ask my body to do what’s necessary, to go through all the obstacles of a long, rigorous season.”
“You get out what you put in,” said Jalen. “I pride myself on putting something in every day – mentally, emotionally, physically – whatever it is, it all matters. You have to compete at everything you do.”
“It really comes down to just working hard, being a good teammate, and focusing on improving every day,” said Tampa Bay wide receiver Chris Godwin. “If you’re able to focus on that, then I think you’ll continue to improve and you’ll see your game take new strides and you’ll be a better player overall.”

3. Teamwork

It takes more than just a roster of talented players to build a championship team. You need chemistry, and that means building trust with your teammates and making sure you’re in sync on game day.

 

“You’re only as strong as your weakest link,” said David. “The offensive line is one of the few positions where all five of us need to be working together to have success. You can’t have individual success. I would say offensive line is the team position within the ‘ultimate team sport.’”
“The biggest lesson I learned from Tom Brady was just how simple you have to make the game,” explained Chris. “So many coaches are used to sticking to their formulas and philosophies, but really it just comes down to percentages. You’re trying to put yourself in the best position to be successful by adjusting plays at the line, being on the same page as your quarterback, and just making sure you’re putting your team in the best position to be successful.”

 

4. Resilience

In such a physical sport, setbacks are bound to happen. Suffering an injury can feel devastating, but the key to getting back in the game is to focus on healing and rebuilding your physical strength. After a season-ending meniscus tear in 2020, Derwin James had to face watching his team from the sidelines, but he refused to let adversity ger the best of him.

“It’s been tough for sure,” said Derwin. “Every time you watch a game and you’re not on the field, you keep thinking about all the plays you could make to help your team out. You have to be mentally tough to keep doing the rehab day in and day out, because it can get grueling for sure. Thankfully my teammates are always there supporting me, because a lot of them know what it’s like. I also lean on my family pretty heavily – they’ve always got my back encouraging me, telling me that I’ll come back stronger.”

 

If you make it to the top, it won’t just be physical injury that can derail you. The business of pro football can be overwhelming, and mistakes or losses on the national stage can be tough to recover from.

 

“As a team, you have to forget quickly in this business,” said David. “It can be very ‘what have you done for me lately,’ and that can leave a sour taste in your mouth. You should use it as motivation, but you shouldn’t dwell on it, because dwelling on something isn’t going to get the job done. Hard work, dedication, preparation, facing adversity, and making the necessary adjustments to get over that adversity is what you need to do in this league.”

 

5. Belief

Playing college ball or making it to the pros takes more than talent. It takes dedication, drive, and – maybe most importantly – belief.

“If you believe in yourself, anything is attainable,” said Jalen. “Put your mind to it, and you can go get it. That’s the message I send out to all kids, everywhere. Do what’s right because it’s right and go get it. You’ve gotta believe in yourself before you do anything.”

 

And when that belief pays off? Well, there’s nothing like it.

 

“Hearing my name called on draft night was an unbelievable feeling,” said Kellen. “One of the best feelings ever. You only have one opportunity to get your name called and it was something that I have worked for my entire life. Knowing all the work that it took to get to that point makes that moment extremely special.”
“Playing for my hometown team has been awesome,” said Chicago tight end Cole Kmet. “Growing up I loved watching some of those guys – Brian Urlacher and Charles Timmons – how they played, how they went about their business, it’s something I try to emulate. So, my advice to anyone trying to make it to this level is continue to work hard and enjoy playing the game you love.”

 

 

Now that you’ve got the tools, it’s time to stock up on the gear you need to make it to the top. Kick off your season with the best football apparel, cleats, accessories, and equipment – all in your team’s colors – when you shop Football By Color at eastbay.com.

2018 Rookie Class: 6 Players To Watch In Indy

2018 Rookie Class: 6 Players To Watch In Indy

Eastbay is going to be on the scene in Indy next week, taking in all the action from pro football’s biggest scouting event and interviewing many of the year’s biggest names. We know you’ll be tuned in to the action as well, so before the 40-yard dash whistle blows and press conference cameras start rolling, two of Eastbay’s writers, Chris Wolff and Jake Zipperer, had a discussion about the names you need to pay attention to this year.

 

Jake: Alright Chris, in about a week, we’ll be on the ground in Indy, interviewing some of the biggest names of the 2018 rookie class. But before everything gets underway, let’s take a second to talk about some of the players we’re most excited to see this weekend. So, I’ll let you start — who’s the first guy that you’ll be looking out for?

Chris: It has to be a quarterback, right? That’s the talk of the draft this year with a stacked class that includes Sam Darnold, Josh Rosen, Josh Allen, Baker Mayfield, and Lamar Jackson. I’m most excited to see Josh Allen, the Wyoming prospect who seems to be one of the draft’s biggest wild cards.

He has the prototypical QB frame at 6-foot-5 and 235 pounds, and a cannon of an arm. His numbers didn’t jump off the page last season with just 1,812 yards, 16 touchdowns and a 56.3% completion percentage, but he has all the physical tools that scouts look for. This weekend will be an opportunity for him to showcase his skill set and stand out against some of his fellow projected first round QBs.

Is there another QB that stands out to you or are you looking elsewhere?

Jake: Yep, Allen is the definition of a boom-or-bust pick, but tons of teams will fall in love with his potential. I could talk about the QBs in this class all day, but figured I’d throw in a curveball and highlight a RB: Rashaad Penny.

He’s the type of player who’s hard to get a read on at this point in the process. It may be impossible to be any more productive than he was last season (2,248 rushing yards, 23 touchdowns), but his team at San Diego State wasn’t exactly facing the Alabama’s and the Georgia’s of the world week after week. It’s the classic ‘is the small school guy going to be able to adjust to the speed and talent of the pro game’ dilemma. If I had to guess, I’d say Penny can make the jump — he’s a quick, shifty back who can gain yardage in a variety of ways. Oh, and he can return! This weekend will go a long way toward deciding his draft stock.

Who’s the next guy on your list? Got a prediction on who will post that ridiculous 40 time?

Chris: If we’re talking about running backs, we have to mention Saquon Barkley.

I don’t know how fast his 40 time will be, but the Penn State star captured the attention of the entire college football world this season with more than his fair share of jaw-dropping plays. He’s a do-it-all back that can pound the rock (three straight 1,000 yard rushing seasons), catch the ball out of the backfield (54 catches for 632 yards this year), and hit homeruns (23 total touchdowns this year, including two return touchdowns). We saw a resurgence of first-round running backs last season with Leonard Fournette and Christian McCaffrey, and Saquan Barkley is poised to join that list. He’s full of talent, built for today’s pass-heavy offenses, and will make an instant impact next year. The only question is how high will he go in a draft class full of stars?

Let’s switch to the other side of the ball — what defensive prospects will you have your eyes on?

Jake: To me, the name to watch on defense is Tremaine Edmunds from Virginia Tech.

He’s just such a unique player. Edmunds is so tall for a linebacker (6’5″), and he’s freakishly fast and strong. Athletes like him don’t come around very often, and when they do, they usually post some ridiculous testing scores in Indy. But more importantly than test scores, he’s the ideal type of linebacker for modern defenses. Fast enough to cover RBs and TEs, powerful enough to generate a consistent pass rush, and aggressive enough to never give up on a play — he can do it all. Defensive coordinators have to be salivating at the idea of having Edmunds as the centerpiece of their defense.

But that’s a name I’m sure many people will be watching closely — Chris, do you have any dark horses that you think will take scouts and GMs by surprise?

Chris: Everybody’s always looking for steals, and this is the perfect time for teams to start identifying guys that they might be able to get in the later rounds. Josey Jewell is a guy who’s projected to go on day three of the draft, but I think he’s going to end up being a valuable piece for some team.

He doesn’t have the same elite athleticism and explosiveness as some of this year’s deep linebacker group, but he can flat out play football. He lead the Big Ten in tackles, racked up 13.5 tackles for loss, 4.5 sacks, and 2 interceptions at Iowa this year. He’s proven his productivity on the field at the college level, so this weekend will be important for him to show scouts that he has the physical abilities to continue that at the next level. He might slip due to his deep position class and lack of flash, but someone’s going to get a steal and a guy who can be a starting linebacker in the league for a long time.

Alright, let’s get to your final one. Does anyone in the secondary stand out to you?

Jake: Well, versatile defensive backs are all the rage in pro football nowadays and Florida State safety Derwin James fits that to a T.

In fact, it’s probably unfair of me to call him a safety. He has the insane athleticism, solid tackling prowess, and alpha-dog mindset needed to be a true chess piece for creative defenses. You want him to line up near the line of scrimmage as a hybrid backer? No problem. He can do that, he can play deep safety, he can play cover corner. I can’t wait to see what his 40 time is and I can’t wait to see how he’s used in a smart defensive scheme in the pros.

 


There will be a lot of great prospects in Indy this year, but make sure to keep your eyes on these six players. Do you agree? Disagree? Hit us up in the comments with your own opinion and make sure to stay locked in to Eastbay’s IG account and our Live Content Hub for a backstage pass to all of the action in Indy.