Four Reasons To Watch The Bigfoot Hoops Las Vegas Classic

Four Reasons To Watch The Bigfoot Hoops Las Vegas Classic

Blog Story Bigfoot Hoops

Another year, another classic. From July 25-29, the Entertainment Capital of the World will play host to the Bigfoot Hoops Las Vegas Classic. The massive basketball tournament has been going on for over 20 years now and is the perfect showcase for some of the brightest young players in the world. You can click here to learn more about the event and tune in to Eastbay’s social feed for exclusive access to the biggest moments. Here are four more reasons why serious hoops fans need to pay attention:

 

Calling This Event ‘Big’ Is An Understatement

In all, over 1,000 teams from a variety of age groups compete in this tournament, making it one of the largest basketball events on the planet. It’s non-stop, high-quality hoops over and over.

 

You’re Catching The Future Of Basketball

Many of your favorite basketball players are Bigfoot Hoops alums. Over 300 pro basketball players are also BigFoot Hoops alumni, including superstars like Kawhi Leonard, Kevin Durant, James Harden, and Russell Westbrook.

 

This Truly Is A World Event

From Germany to Canada, from China to Spain, international teams from all over the world travel to Vegas for this prestigious tourney. This is your chance to see the next great international player in the states before everyone else.

 

It’s Major Recruiting Ground

Since this is one of the last big events of the recruiting season, some of the best coaches in the nation will be in the stands, taking it all in and getting the chance to see these amateur players in action.

A Look Back: July 1999

A Look Back: July 1999

By Drew Hammell

July – one of the best months of the year for kids. School’s out, and it’s time to hit the beach or the pool for some rest and relaxation. For the dedicated athlete, however, July is a time to work. The long, hot, humid days are the ones that separate the average athletes from the elite. The football player is up early hitting the weight room and running sprints because the fall season is rapidly approaching. The basketball player is out on the court putting up 500 jump shots before noon. And the cross-country runner is up early and getting in 10 miles before the temperature hits 90.

Built For The Future, Inspired By The Past: The Nike Air Max Trainer 1

Built For The Future, Inspired By The Past: The Nike Air Max Trainer 1

Let’s flash back to the 1980s. The hair was big, the jackets were denim, and the Sony Walkman cassette player was revolutionizing how people listened to music. The world of sports was changing too, as athletes were getting faster and stronger than ever before and needed a shoe that could keep up.

When it came time to work out, they needed to bring multiple different shoes: one for running, one for lifting, and one for court exercises. These athletes deserved a shoe that could do it all — one that was as versatile and dynamic as they were. And lucky for them, Tinker Hatfield was on the case.

Nike Air Max Trainer 1 3

 

In 1987, the legendary sneaker designer went to his lab and emerged with the Nike Air Trainer 1. After numerous visits to the gym to study how modern athletes worked out, he had crafted a shoe that was stable enough to lift in, light enough to run in, and comfortable enough to play sports in.

The Air Trainer 1 had a forefoot strap for total lockdown during lateral cuts and featured Nike Air technology for advanced cushioning and comfort. Its high-cut style and redesigned heel lift helped it bridge the gap between runner and court shoe. It was, without a doubt, the jack-of-all-trades training shoe that Nike hoped it would be, and it helped birth the cross-training movement. But it was somehow even more than that: it was a fashion staple too.

It started with tennis star John McEnroe, who was given an early prototype of the Air Trainer 1. He started training in them, and loved their performance and stability so much that he started wearing them during matches. Before long, other elite athletes and cultural icons like Bo Jackson were rocking the shoe and its popularity skyrocketed.

Flash forward over 30 years later, and the shoe that started a movement is making a comeback. The new Nike Air Max Trainer 1 takes design and style inspirations from that classic ’87 trainer and reinvigorates it for the 21st century.

Nike Air Max Trainer 1 2

Modern Performance

The heel unit is now packed with Max Air to ensure that you’ll get maximum comfort during every move you make. A supportive mesh/leather upper and durable rubber outsole keep this shoe versatile, comfortable, and durable.

Classic Inspiration

The Air Max Trainer 1 even has an updated version of the OG’s forefoot strap for lockdown support. One of the first colorways pays homage to the original’s classic grey, white, and green ‘Chlorophyll’ look.

 


In other words, the new Nike Air Max Trainer 1 is the best of both worlds. It’s upgraded for today’s modern athlete, but keeps the elements that made the original great in the first place.

The Nike Air Max Trainer 1 is available now at eastbay.com.

*You could win a prize pack of signature basketball shoes by entering our Nothing But Net Sweepstakes. Sign up for your chance to win big.

A Look Back: The Air Jordan XI “Playoffs”

A Look Back: The Air Jordan XI “Playoffs”

Black socks, black sneakers: a big no-no in the basketball fashion world back in the early ‘90s. The combination just looked strange, until Michigan’s Fab 5 flipped the script and rewrote fashion history with their baggy shorts, black Nike socks, and black Air Force Max sneakers in ‘93. A few years later in the ‘96 NBA Playoffs, Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls would pull off the same look on their way to winning the Championship. The Fab 5 started the black sock/black shoe trend. The Chicago Bulls mastered it.

In 1995, Michael Jordan returned to the League after a brief retirement. The Bulls would make the playoffs, and together would don black sneakers on the court (except for Jordan, who liked his new white/black Air Jordan XI so much, he decided to rock them instead of an all-black sneaker. He’d later be fined and ordered by the NBA to wear sneakers that matched his teammates, so he switched to Penny Hardaway’s Air Flight One for one game, and then to his Air Jordan XI “Space Jam” colorway).

The Bulls would come up short that season, but it was only fuel for the ’95-’96 campaign. Jordan would wear his AJ XI “Concord” colorway the entire regular season, but then break out a new color for the playoffs: the Air Jordan XI black/white/red. The Bulls as a team also switched to black shoes and socks for the playoffs. Along with Jordan, Scottie Pippen wore an all-black Nike Air More Uptempo, and Dennis Rodman sported an all-black Nike Air Shake Ndestrukt. Pippen’s Uptempo and Rodman’s Ndestrukt are now both considered classic ‘90s Nike basketball shoes, but Jordan’s XI stood out the most.

Touted as “the best performance basketball shoe for the best player on earth – Michael Jordan,” the AJ XI featured a lightweight, supportive, and breathable combination of ballistic mesh, full-grain leather, and reinforced patent leather with a nylon speed lacing system. A Phylon midsole with a full-length Air-Sole unit was supported by a full-length carbon fiber spring plate to encourage elevation. The outsole was a combination of clear gum rubber and solid rubber herringbone traction inserts. This sneaker was truly a work of art, and MJ would wear it during one of the greatest runs by any team in the history of sports.

During the regular season, the Bulls went 72-10, and then crushed their competition in the playoffs. The Bulls would win their fourth championship on Father’s Day – an emotional day for MJ. After the game, he ran straight into the locker room and collapsed onto the floor – crying and thinking about his father who died several years earlier.

Back in the ‘90s, not many shoes sold out as fast as they do today. But sometimes, a shoe was so popular that Eastbay couldn’t keep them in the warehouse long enough to edit the newest catalog. This was the case with the AJ XI black/white/red.  The shoe was featured in two Eastbay Spring ’96 catalogs, but was gone by the time the second catalog went to the printers.

A Look Back: Jordan Brand January ’98

A Look Back: Jordan Brand January ’98

1998 was a pivotal year for Michael Jordan, the world’s greatest basketball player of all time. The ’97-’98 season would be his final one as a Chicago Bull. He won his sixth and final championship that year over the Utah Jazz and was the League, All-Star, and Finals MVP. While all that was going on, Nike was busy establishing the foundation for Jordan’s next steps after his inevitable second retirement. This involved creating a distinct differentiation between Jordan Brand and Nike.

As a sub-brand of Nike, Jordan Brand’s aim was to be as pure, unique and authentic as Michael himself. The brand would use the Jumpman logo exclusively and made its official retail debut late in 1997. “I have been involved in the design of everything I have worn from Nike since we began our relationship in 1984. The launch of the Jordan Brand is simply an extension of that process,” said Jordan in a 1997 press release. “It is an exciting and challenging opportunity to express myself and connect with the next generation of players. I look forward to being involved in every step of this new venture.”