Eastbay Performance Explained: Why You Should Buy Eastbay’s New Athletic Apparel

Eastbay Performance Explained: Why You Should Buy Eastbay’s New Athletic Apparel

Eastbay Performance is here! The new apparel line is designed for the 24/7 athlete – those who want to look and feel their best in the gym, on the training field, and everywhere in between. Athletes like Philadelphia’s Jalen Hurts, who trusts Eastbay Performance to get him through tough quarterback workouts, travel days, or two-a-days.

The Eastbay Performance line includes a few different collections, including Compression, GymTech, WindTech, and TempTech. Each collection is built to meet the specific needs of an athlete, both in and outside the game.

Eastbay Performance Athletic Apparel Compression Collection

Eastbay Compression

Compression is a must-have for every athlete in every sport. Eastbay’s new collection includes shorts, tights, tanks, and tops in a variety of staple colors so you always have the support you need to put in the work. They’re perfect for layering under GymTech apparel when you’re in the weight room or running drills or under your uniform on gamedays, and their moisture-wicking fabric pulls sweat away from your body so you stay comfortable and focused.

Stock up on new Eastbay Compression here ->

 

Eastbay Performance Athletic Apparel GymTech Collection

Eastbay GymTech

Eastbay’s GymTech collection is apparel designed to be light and comfortable for any type of workout and every sport. These shorts, tops, and jackets are made from stretchy, breathable fabric cut in a regular fit for comfort and a full range of motion. So whether you’re lifting, lunging, or lounging around before practice starts, you’ll be cool and comfortable. Jalen Hurts swears by the GymTech Short-Sleeve Tee for all his workouts.

Grab new gym gear from Eastbay’s GymTech collection here ->
Eastbay Performance Athletic Apparel WindTech Collection

Eastbay WindTech

Designed for warmups, cooldowns, or going to and from practice, Eastbay’s WindTech collection features pants, shorts, and jackets in classic colors so you can easily pair them with any of the Eastbay Performance pieces. Ultra-lightweight with built-in ventilation panels and reflective details, the WindTech pieces are great for when the weather starts getting a little cooler and you want to keep your muscles warmed up and ready to go.

Check out the full WindTech collection here ->
Eastbay Performance Athletic Apparel TempTech Collection

Eastbay TempTech

Being an athlete never stops. It’s more than a game – it’s a lifestyle – so even when you’re not training or playing, you need apparel that’s comfortable and flattering while still bringing that competitive edge. Eastbay’s TempTech collection has sweats, hoodies, and full-zips that deliver all three. These pieces are warm with a regular fit that keeps you comfortable and relaxed in class, on the bus, or hanging with the team. Jalen Hurts’ favorite way to rock TempTech is as a full sweatsuit. His go-tos are the Pullover Hoodie and matching Fleece Pant.

Layer up in TempTech here ->
Eastbay Performance Athletic Apparel Game. Train. Live.

We know you’re focused on crushing goals and breaking records this season, so make sure your athletic apparel is up to the challenge. Eastbay Performance is a must-have for every athlete.

Shop the full collection at eastbay.com

Game. Train. Live.

Game Recognize Game: Richland High School’s Griffin LaRue is our September Winner

Game Recognize Game: Richland High School’s Griffin LaRue is our September Winner

Each month Eastbay is highlighting a top high school athlete by spotlighting their accomplishments both in and outside the game. This month’s winner is All State wide receiver Griffin LaRue from Richland High School in Johnstown, PA.

For Griffin, football is more than a game – it’s everything to him. And he backs that up with hard work and dedication. Now in his last year at Richland High, Griffin is getting ready to take his game to the next level, and he can’t wait to see what happens next. Here’s what he told us about being the thrill of competing, being a role model, and what he hopes for the future:

What is your definition of a successful student-athlete?

My definition of a successful student-athlete is a student who can excel in the classroom day in and day out, and still achieve all their goals and dreams on field.

What has been the highlight of your athletic career so far, and what makes that moment stand out for you?

I would say the highlight of my athletic career so far is definitely my first offer.  That moment gave me indescribable happiness!

Who is your role model in athletics?

My role model would definitely have to be LaRod Stephens-Howling.  Growing up and playing football in the same town in the same city as I am currently and still making it to the league and winning a Super Bowl is beyond crazy and inspiring to me.

How important is it to you to be a role model for younger athletes?

It’s extremely important to me, especially with me having two younger siblings that look up to everything I do and take after me.  Growing up with two older brothers, I always looked up to them and followed in their footsteps, and I want to guide my younger siblings and young student-athletes in the correct direction.

What do you love most about competing?

What I love most about competing is the intensity.  When I line up across from someone, I think in my head “It’s my family vs. their’s” and I’ll choose mine any day of the year.

What are some of the goals you’d like to achieve after high school, and what are you most looking forward to?

My biggest out-of-this-world goal is to someday have a gold jacket on, but that’s me shooting for the stars. But I truly just want to be different and make a name for myself and to prove everyone that doubted me wrong.  One thing I’m extremely excited for and looking forward to is just going to college in general.  I feel like college will be a whole new world for me, and especially with football on top of it I feel I will learn so much.

 

To nominate a deserving athlete for Eastbay’s Game Recognize Game series, fill out the form here.

Make sure to follow us on Instagram @officialeastbay and @eastbaywomen

A Look Back: A Breakdown of the Best Running Sneakers From Fall ’97

A Look Back: A Breakdown of the Best Running Sneakers From Fall ’97

24 years ago, it seemed like every major sneaker brand was churning out a classic sneaker model. Most remember 1997 as an epic year for shoes like the Air Max 97 and the Adidas Equipment Salvation, but every brand was bringing a sleek new design or a new technology to the table. If you were a runner, how could you decide between all these incredible silhouettes? It was definitely a daunting challenge, which Eastbay was up for.

To make it easier, Eastbay broke down each running sneaker into one of four different categories:

Support: Shoes with special features that help runners who either overpronate (roll inward), have a low arch, are hard on shoes, need a straighter last, wear orthotics, need more midfoot and heel control, or need firmer midsoles.

Cushioned Support: Shoes with features that combine cushion and support for runners who slightly overpronate (rolling inward), have low to normal arch, are a heel striker or need some motion control yet want a cushioned ride.

Cushioned: Shoes with features that emphasize cushioning with some support, for runners who under pronate, supinate (roll outward), need curve last, high arch, are a heel, mid or forefoot striker, have rigid feet, need flexibility, or run efficiently.

Lightweight: Shoes designed with little support and good cushioning for runners who are efficient, train at faster speeds, have normal to rigid arch, are not susceptible to injury, or need flexibility.

On top of that, Eastbay also sold Trail Runners and Road Flats. Here’s a breakdown of the best sneakers from each category back in 1997:

Look Back Eastbay Catalog Supportive Running Sneakers Fall 1997

Support

adidas Lexicon Extra

The Adidas Lexicon was a beautifully-designed sneaker that doesn’t get enough love. Retailing at $99.99, it was on the higher end of the spectrum for Adidas runners. The Lexicon Extra featured Point of Deflection System technology in the heel, an EVA midsole, a full-length medial post, and Support Torsion system.

Saucony G.R.I.D. Procyon

Saucony’s most supportive runner was the G.R.I.D. Procyon, which featured their patented heel G.R.I.D. system for cushioning, along with a rearfoot medial support device. Retailing at just $74.99, it was a bargain for those needing that extra support without the added cost.

Nike Air Equilibrium

The Equilibrium was Nike’s state-of-the-art support sneaker for those with flat feet. You can’t see the medial side of this shoe in the picture, but the amount of support provided was off the charts. Featuring a Phylon midsole, the Equilibrium also had Zoom-Air units in the heel and forefoot with individually tuned pods. The BRS 1000 carbon rubber outsole featured a sculpted central guidance channel with a lateral Duralon forefoot.

New Balance 585

New Balance has always been loved by flat-footed runners, and the 585 was a reliable model for the brand. Made in the USA, the 585 featured a synthetic upper with 3M Scotchlite Reflective trim, a 4-density polyurethane midsole with a Rollbar Stability System. Runners got all this tech for under $100.

ASICS GEL-MC 126

ASICS was another trustworthy brand for flat-footed runners, and the best model back in ‘97 for them was the GEL-MC 126. Featuring a motion control system for heavy overpronators, the GEL-MC 126 was semi-curved and built on a EE last for wider feet. It had a compression-molded EVA midsole with extended Duomax, and ASICS GEL cushioning in the heel.

Look Back Eastbay Catalog Cushioned Support Running Sneakers Fall 1997

Cushioned Support

adidas Response

The adidas Response line was incredibly popular throughout the ‘90s. The sleek yet simple designs and affordable price points made them a great option for many runners. The Response featured exceptional cushioning with added stability, a dual density compression-molded EVA midsole, visible adiprene cushioning in the heel, and a new Torsion system for stability.

Saucony 3D G.R.I.D. Hurricane

This was my first ever running sneaker in high school, and they were a lot of fun to run in. The 3D G.R.I.D. had a sleek design and a ton of tech inside to match. The visible 3D G.R.I.D. system wrapped the midsole with Hytrel filaments that cushioned and absorbed shock, while adding stability and motion control. At $99.99, it was Saucony’s top-of-the-line running sneaker at the time.

ASICS GEL-Kayano

This was ASICS’ best shoe for high-mileage runners. With a DuoMax compression-molded EVA midsole, a mesh reinforced upper with synthetic leather, the Kayano featured a blown rubber forefoot with DuoSole insert and AHAR heel plug, along with forefoot P-Gel and heel T-Gel. Basically the Kayano had really great cushioning and a lot of Gel inside. At $124.99, it was one of the most expensive runners at the time, but well worth the price.

New Balance 999

Basically anyone who’s ever tried on the 999 falls in love with them. This was and still is one of New Balance’s most iconic silhouettes. Featuring a pigskin leather upper with 3M Scotchlite reflective trim, the 999 had ABZORB cushioning in the heel, along with ENCAP cushioning in the heel and C-CAP cushioning in the forefoot. Made in the USA, the 999 retailed for $125.

Nike Air Structure Triax

As for Nike, their top cushioned support model was the Air Structure Triax. For the runner who wanted a well-cushioned ride with added stability, the Structure Triax featured a Phylon midsole with two key stability features: a Footbridge stability device and a patented Heel Hinge feature. The Structure also had Nike Air in the heel and forefoot.

Look Back Eastbay Catalog Cushioned Running Sneakers Fall 1997

Cushioned

Nike Air Max 97

It doesn’t get much bigger than the Air Max 97. That fall, we were blessed with one of the biggest breakthroughs in sneaker cushioning of all time. The new anatomically designed dual-pressure Air-Sole unit with a lateral crash pad system cushioned and guided the foot like no sneaker ever had before. Designed by Christian Tresser, the unique upper was inspired both by water dropping into a pond, as well as the metallic finish of mountain bike components. Next year will be the 25th anniversary of this hallowed silhouette.

 Reebok DMX 2000 

Reebok was turning heads and pleasing feet of all shapes and sizes with their revolutionary DMX cushioning technology. With the Reebok DMX 2000, runners actually felt the air flow from their heel to their forefoot as they ran. This was an incredible breakthrough in technology, and transitioned well to Allen Iverson’s The Answer 1 basketball sneaker as well.

adidas Equipment Salvation

To compete with Air Max and DMX cushioning, adidas was launching their “Feet You Wear” technology, which allowed the runner’s feet to function more naturally. The semi-curved last, compression-molded EVA midsole and adiPRENE inserts in the Salvation provided plenty of cushioning and responsiveness for runners.

Puma Cell Speed

Puma featured their own state-of-the-art cushioning system with the Puma Cell Speed, which featured a PUMA CELL midsole with polyurethane frame. Touted as the ultimate training shoe for high-mileage runners that require a stable, well-cushioned ride, the Cell Speed was a somewhat niche running sneaker. CELL technology was similar to Reebok’s Hexalite technology, in that the cushioning was designed like a honeycomb pad filled with air.

Fila Silva Trainer

Another very niche runner was the Fila Silva Trainer, which provided outstanding cushioning for high-mileage training. The Silva Trainer featured a Filabuck and Ripstop nylon upper, and a compression-molded EVA midsole with 2A technology in the heel and forefoot. Fila’s 2A technology was very similar to Nike Air in the fact that it featured separate “pods” of air to provide cushioning to the foot.

Look Back Eastbay Catalog Lightweight Running Sneakers Fall 1997

Lightweight

Nike Air Zoom Spiridon

The ultimate shoe for a fast, responsive ride. Featured in the “It’s OK to be fast” ad campaign with sprinter Michael Johnson, the Spiridon was another revolutionary sneaker because of its full-length running specific Zoom-Air cushioning. The Spiridon was one of the first running sneakers to feature Zoom Air, and it would set the stage for the many more iconic running sneakers for decades to come.

Nike Air Max Light III

A responsive, lightweight, low-profile, fast-paced trainer! The Air Max Light III has yet to retro, which is a shame because it was ahead of its time as well. Not only was there a dual-pressure visible Air-Sole unit in the heel, there was also Zoom Air in the forefoot. This was one of the very first sneakers to feature both Air Max cushioning AND Zoom Air in the same sneaker, and definitely doesn’t get enough love from sneakerheads.

Reebok Electrolyte

A sneaker that most have forgotten about by now, the Electrolyte was Reebok’s take on the fast-paced, lightweight running sneaker. The Electrolyte featured 3D UltraLite cushioning, which combined the outsole and midsole into one injection-molded unit. This resulted in lighter weight and greater flexibility, along with an enhanced road feel. Reebok boasted that the 3D UltraLite reduced shoe weight by up to 10%. The Electrolyte was a feathery 9.8 ounces.

Saucony 3D-G.R.I.D. B-Gone

Saucony really made some bold sneakers back in the ‘90s – the B-Gone was a flashy lightweight trainer for fast-paced workouts or races. Featuring a dual density Maxlite EVA midsole with a visible heel 3D G.R.I.D. system, the B-Gone is another Saucony model that deserves a proper retro release at this point.

Look Back Eastbay Catalog Road Flats Running Sneakers Fall 1997

Road Flats

Nike Air Rift

Nike was dropping some ridiculous models, even in the road flat category back in ‘97. One of the most outlandish was the Air Rift, which featured a minimalistic upper and split toe. There was Nike Air in the heel, and they came with a special pair of split toe socks.

Nike Air Zoom Streak

Nike also created a low-profile racing flat for 5K to marathons called the Air Zoom Streak, which featured Zoom Air units in the heel and forefoot. There was a Air Streak Light version as well, which only weighed 6.6 ounces and was available from size 3 all the way up to size 15. This was an incredible value for such a lightweight, responsive racing flat.

ASICS GEL-Magic Racer

ASICS also made a technology-packed racer called the GEL-Magic. Described as a performance racing flat for all distances, the GEL-Magic featured a dual-density compression-molded EVA midsole with rearfoot HEXGEL. It also had a Magic Sole forefoot with AHAR heel plug.

Look Back Eastbay Catalog Trail Running Sneakers Fall 1997

Trail Runners

adidas Response Trail

The Response Trail is a line adidas could keep bringing back again and again, and loyal followers would never lose interest in them. The mist/lake/slime colorway is just as fashionable now as it was back in 1997. The Response Trail was a versatile training shoe that was great for on and off-road use. It featured synthetic leather and a water-resistant mesh upper, along with adiPrene cushioning in the heel. At $79.99, it was a great value for a comfortable, fashionable trail shoe.

Nike Air Terra Sertig

The Terra Sertig was Nike’s top-of-the-line trail shoe back in ‘97. The Sertig had all the bells and whistles, including a very low profile Phylon midsole with heel and forefoot Zoom Air units. Its three-quarter height was designed for the demands of alpine running. There was a protective fabric web between the midsole, and a bi-directional waffle outsole that protected against stone bruises.

Nike Air Terra Albis

Basically a low-cut version of the Sertig, the Albis was also a low-profile trail shoe with exceptional cushioning. The Albis featured most of the same tech as the Sertig, except it had an Air Sole in the heel instead of Zoom Air. Regardless, it was a gorgeous, aggressive design that showed how serious Nike was about trail runners.

Nike Air Humara

Back in the late ‘90s, the Humara line enjoyed a very popular run. This particular Humara boasted a ton of tech, including a heel Air Sole unit and a Zoom Air unit in the forefoot. It was the ultimate low-profile cushioned trail shoe, with a lightweight breathable mesh upper and non-absorbent synthetic leather overlays. The traction was excellent as well, with a rubberized, abrasion-resistant tip and heel overlay.

Drew Hammell A Look Back

Drew is the creator of @nikestories on Instagram. Growing up in the ’90s, Drew loved playing soccer, basketball, tennis, and even dabbled in cross country running. He ended up focusing on tennis in high school and helped lead his team to multiple state titles. His favorite athletes growing up include Michael Jordan, Allen Iverson, Andre Agassi, and Ken Griffey, Jr. He was smart enough to save all his old Eastbay catalogs from the ’90s and loves sharing them with the sneaker community. Follow him at @nikestories or read more of his work here.

A Look Back: Fall Sports ’99

A Look Back: Fall Sports ’99

“We’ve got what’s hot for fall,” read the caption on the front cover of the August 1999 Eastbay catalog. Looking back, that was actually a massive understatement. It was always sad to realize that school was just around the corner, but it was also exciting because fall sports were here. For the pros, MLB playoff races were heating up, and the NFL season was kicking off. Plus, college football was starting as well. For us kids, we were perusing the pages for our Back to School pair of sneakers, apparel, and soccer or football cleats. There were way too many kicks to choose from, as the August ‘99 Eastbay catalog was packed with a ton of new styles for the fall. Plus, they had their website up and running with over 17,000 products online. Here’s a look back at some of the classic kicks from that season.

A Look Back Eastbay Catalog Fall '99 Trail Running

Trail Running

This particular Eastbay issue kicked right off with Trail Running, which was a little random for them. Typically we saw Basketball, Running or Football first. I was totally fine with the change, as all the big brands were cranking out some dope trail runners. adidas was leading the charge with the Response Trail and Incision. They both featured adiPRENE cushioning in the heel and forefoot. Nike was close behind with some great trail runners as well, including the all new Air Terra Goatek. The Goatek had a super-grippy outsole that worked like a goat’s hoof. If Goatek, aka G-Tek sounds familiar, it’s because rapper Drake’s new sneaker also uses this OG technology. And don’t forget about the New Balance 802 – back when I worked at Foot Locker in high school, I remember selling a ton of these.

A Look Back Eastbay Catalog Fall Sports '99 Running

Running

Nike was churning out crazy technological cushioning advances, including visible Zoom Air in the Air Zoom Citizen, a heel Tuned Air unit in the Air Max Plus, and a full-length Tuned Air unit in the Air Tuned Max. The Tuned Max and Air Max Plus have retroed, but we’re still waiting patiently for the return of the Citizen. The Air Zoom Citizen was developed by Rick Lower, who had some challenges designing it with the new visible Zoom Air cushioning. Over time, it has become a cult favorite, however. adidas was dropping plenty of popular runners as well, including the Response, Ozweego, Supernova, Equipment Ride, and Universal. All had super-clean looks with great adiPRENE cushioning inside.

Look Back Eastbay Catalog Fall Sports '99 Basketball

Basketball

This was back when Jordan Brand was becoming its own entity apart from Nike. Jordan Brand had their own section in Eastbay, leading off the basketball part of the catalog. There was plenty of apparel, and some shoes that might look familiar including the Air Jordan XIV Low, the 3 Percent (MJ’s body fat percentage at the time), the Trunner, and the Quick 6 (for Eddie Jones). Interestingly, that UNC-themed AJ XIV was a sample pair – the pair that released to the public had perforations on the upper instead of the smooth leather. The Nike Basketball pages were full of unique silhouettes, including the debut of the Air Flightposite (dropped 8/18/1999), the Vroomlicious, the Air Tuned Uptempo, and the Air Pippen III. Allen Iverson’s Reebok Questions were still going strong 3 years after they originally dropped, with low-cut versions taking off for the warmer months.

Look Back Eastbay Catalog Fall Sports '99 Tennis

Tennis

Some great tennis models were available, including Andre Agassi’s Air Zoom Beyond (designed by Wilson Smith) and Air Court Motion (designed by Peter Hudson). The Air Zoom Sterling for women also featured visible Zoom Air like the Beyond. The GTS Lo, which stands for “Great Tennis Shoe” as the story goes, was a very popular casual model. I personally owned both the Air Zoom Beyond to play in for matches, and the Air Duration II to practice in.

Look Back Eastbay Catalog Fall Sports '99 Soccer

Soccer

Nike was putting out some incredibly high-quality soccer boots, including the Mercurial R9, which was designed for Brazilian football superstar Ronaldo. There was also a women’s version called the Air Zoom M9, which was made for American women’s star Mia Hamm. Along with the Mercurial and M9, there was also the Air Rio Zoom, which featured a full-length Zoom Air sockliner. adidas was obviously no slouch in the football department, and dropped the Equipment Predator Accelerator for a whopping $164.99. adidas also made the Equipment Maneeta – the first Predator shoe designed for women.

Look Back Eastbay Catalog Fall Sports '99 Training

Sport Training

The Cross Training section was packed with trainers that don’t get enough love, including the Total Air Griffey Max, the Air Max 120, and the Air 90. This was also when the Air Sunder Max was making big waves. Nike trainers in general were getting very bright and colorful, and utilized all sorts of cushioning, from Zoom Air, to Tuned Air, to Air Max.

Look Back Eastbay Catalog Fall Sports '99 Football

Football

Think Eastbay shoppers loved football? This issue had 9 pages dedicated just to the cleats alone. That’s not even counting additional pages featuring plenty more football equipment and jerseys. Stars like Keyshawn Johnson, Peyton Manning, Chris Slade, Howard Griffeth, Antonio Freeman, Doug Flutie, Barry Sanders, John Randle all made cameo appearances on those pages. Cleats like the Air Zoom Apocalypse, Pro Shark Stove, and Reebok Pro Shroud gave players of all ages and levels great options to choose from.

Want to see more of Drew’s classic Eastbay catalog collection? Make sure you check out all of his Look Back stories.

Drew Hammell A Look Back

Drew is the creator of @nikestories on Instagram. Growing up in the ’90s, Drew loved playing soccer, basketball, tennis, and even dabbled in cross country running. He ended up focusing on tennis in high school and helped lead his team to multiple state titles. His favorite athletes growing up include Michael Jordan, Allen Iverson, Andre Agassi, and Ken Griffey, Jr. He was smart enough to save all his old Eastbay catalogs from the ’90s and loves sharing them with the sneaker community. Follow him at @nikestories or read more of his work here.

Up To The Challenge: Jalen Hurts Is Ready For A New Era In Philly

Up To The Challenge: Jalen Hurts Is Ready For A New Era In Philly

Jalen Hurts has something to prove. After a rollercoaster rookie season in Philly, the quarterback is ready to step up to the plate as QB1 and lead his team to a successful season. As regular season kickoff approaches, he has one goal in mind: WIN.

We asked Jalen about Philly’s new leadership, what he’s most excited for this season, and what kind of mark he wants to leave on the game. Here’s what he had to say.

“Jalen Hurts is a rare breed.

I’m gonna prove that I am what I say I am. “

Q: You’ve got a new head coach and a new offensive system to adapt to this year. What has the transition to this new system been like, and what are you most excited about for this offense?

A: This year, I’m excited for an opportunity to do what I love – to go out there and play and compete. We truly have an opportunity to do something special, and taking advantage of that, working, holding each other accountable to do the things that we need to do so we can be successful, that’s what I’m most excited about.

We’re going into this new season with new everything – new coaches, new playbook, everything’s new – and we’re very excited about it. Excited about the energy Coach Sirianni is bringing in, the values and principles he’s instilling in the team. Piece by piece, we’re buying into it, coming together and being a true team, getting ready to go out there and have success.

Q: What are some personal goals you’ve set for yourself this upcoming season?

A: When it comes to individual goals and personal goals, I talk to God and we have our good conversations. But I keep it very simple: Win, Win, Win. That’s why we work. That’s where my joy comes from. It comes from winning.

There’s always the thrill of not being satisfied. Knowing that there’s always room for improvement, always more to work on. Enough is never enough.

 

Philadelphia Eagles Quarterback Jalen Hurts Eastbay Football By Color

“My football career will be defined by me. Did I use this game of football to open up doors elsewhere, create new roads and avenues to serve, uplift, change? Did I do that? That’s how I define it.”

 Q: Where do you think we will see the biggest leap in your game?

A: Ever since I came into college, my freshmen year, sophomore year, junior year, senior year, every year I just gradually got better. And it just clicked for me. You take natural steps as a player – with the work you put in and what you invest – you get that out in the end, when you put that work in and you do things the right way. I’m just ready for it. I’m excited for it.

Q: Most often with teams, the quarterback is the leader in the locker room. This will be your first season in Philly where there is a strong chance you’ll be the starting QB. How do you go about getting guys, some who have never been around you or played with you before, to buy into the team and buy into you as the leader of the team?

A: You have to compete at everything you do. We’re in this every single day and you get out what you put in. I pride myself on putting something in every day – mentally, emotionally, physically, whatever it is – it all matters. In a nutshell, that’s what my leadership is. Accountability is value #1 for me. Not being a hypocrite is value #2, because as a leader, people are going to look at you and say, “What are you doing? How is he handling this?” All eyes are on you, so how you respond to a situation is very crucial. I never get on a guy, I never hassle a guy for not doing something that I ain’t doing. As a leader, I try to be a man of character, I try to be a man that’s going to do my job. I hold myself to the highest standard possible. So anything anyone else says doesn’t mean much to me, because I have the highest standard.

Q: You’ve got one of your old Alabama teammates in DeVonta Smith lined up out wide again. How was it getting on the same page and getting back that chemistry that you two had in college?  

A: It’s really crazy, because you talk about having a family feel on a football team. I’ve been fortunate enough to build those relationships with people I haven’t been with as far back as college, from the offensive line to the defensive line to the secondary to other guys in the receiving core, and that’s exciting. But having DeVonta is crazy because we talked about it. We spoke it into existence. We said, we’ll play again. We’ll get a real shot at this. And here we have a great opportunity to do something special.

Jalen Hurts Philadelphia Eagles Quarterback Eastbay Football By Color

“Football is more than a game. I think about all the opportunities I’ve had due to this game. Picking up a ball when I was four years old, just having it in my hand, all the experiences coming up as a kid, the opportunities I’ve had to serve, to uplift, impact those around me, young and old. It’s more than a game. And in my eyes, that’s what it’s all about. If I left tomorrow, I could look back and say I’ve impacted people’s lives.”

 

Q: Philly crowds are notoriously tough to please. Would you say Alabama or Philly has a more raucous fanbase?

A: Alabama has a high pedigree of winning championships, and that standard has been instilled in me. Go to Oklahoma, and it’s the same thing. A tough fan base that expects greatness, that expects a standard of play at the highest level. They expect to be in the playoffs and compete for national titles. It’s the same thing here in Philadelphia, the grittiness and the “get muddy, get dirty” mentality to go get it done. I admire that.

Q: Including college and your time in the league, you’ve had quite an interesting career. Looking back, if you had the chance to give some advice to 14-year-old Jalen Hurts, what would it be?

A: Where I’m sitting now, I have this opportunity where I can be a light to so many children around the world. I think about what message I want to deliver to them. I truly believe if you believe in yourself, anything is attainable. Put your mind to it, and you can go get it. And that’s the message I send out to all kids, everywhere. Listen to the people around you, respect the people around you, your elders. Do what’s right because it’s right and go get it. You’ve gotta believe in yourself before you do anything.

Jalen Hurts Philadelphia Eagles QB Eastbay Football By Color

Want to know more about Jalen and how he made his dreams of going pro a reality? We’ve got you covered. Here are the Five Tools You Need To Make It In The League, straight from him and some other players you might recognize.

And make sure you stock up on all the gear you need for a successful season. Shop FTBL X CLR at eastbay.com and suit up in your team’s colors.

Improve Your 40-Yard Dash Time With Tips From Cleveland’s Anthony Schwartz

Improve Your 40-Yard Dash Time With Tips From Cleveland’s Anthony Schwartz

Anthony Schwartz is FAST. Not only did he run a 4.29 40 at the 2021 Combine, but the former track star also holds the world under-18 best in the 100 meters at 10.15 seconds. Even without a single pro game under his belt (yet), it’s safe to say Schwartz is one of the fastest players in the league.

While he’s currently prepping for his rookie season with Cleveland, the 2021 Draft Pick took a minute to chat with us about training for the Combine, the importance of the 40-yard dash, and the best ways to increase your explosiveness and cut down your times.

Q: Were there any differences when you were practicing getting off the line as quickly as possible in track vs. for the 40 yard dash? 

A: For the 40, you have to be a little more explosive because you don’t have those hundred meters to make up. The 40 is more about getting out and digging back and digging out.

Q: What is something vitally important to running a good 40 time that the casual observer might not think of? 

A: I would say it would have to be arms, because your legs can only move as fast as your arms are pumping. So you have to keep your arms going and keep them pumping in order to keep your legs moving fast. They also help you in the start, too. Explosive arms help you get off to an explosive start. 

Q: What is another test at the Combine that could boost a receiver’s stock? 

A: I would say the 5-10-5 shuttle drill because it shows your short-range agility. It also helps you follow directions, because you have to touch the line and if you don’t, it shows you aren’t good at following directions. It’s more mental than physical, but it’s still very physical and can help a receiver up their stock. 

Q: Do you think that the 40-yard dash is still a useful test to measure someone’s speed on the football field or do you think it’s a little outdated?

A: I think for skill positions it’s still helpful. Really the most important part is the ten-yard split, but it shows that you’re able to maintain that speed, and having them run it again shows that they’re able to do it consistently. But I think lineman should only run 10 or 15 yards because if they’re running more than 10 or 15 yards in a game-time situation, then their job is done. 

Q: How much focus is there on running a good 40 time versus prepping and focusing on the other Combine drills? 

A: There’s more focus on the 40 because that’s kind of the make or break for some people. Some people wanna run a fast 40 because they need to, others just have to maintain their 40, so the 40 is really the most important thing. The other drills just kinda fall in because they’re not really looking to that as much as they’re looking at the 40. 

Q: Do you ever think we will see someone run a sub 4-second 40? 

A: I think it could be possible, but I don’t think it would be by a football player. I think it would have to be a track runner or something. 

Q: What are some of the best workouts you do to increase your acceleration? 

A: I like doing sled pulls. You know, tying a sled around your waist and running with it. It helps make your starts more powerful and it also helps with endurance and being able to keep your speed up. 

Q: Were there any other workouts you were doing to prep for the 40? 

A: I was really focused on my start because I had the end of the race down. I wanted to get my start better and have it be more explosive. 

Q: What are some common exercises that athletes do to improve their speed that don’t actually help that much? 

A: I would say some stuff in the weight room that people do doesn’t work at all. The weight room will get you more powerful but it’s not going to get you faster. You have to be out on the field running. You have to be out on the track running. And it’s something that comes with time. People think it’s a short-term thing, but you’re never going to be out on the track one weekend and be that much faster. It’s a grind, something you have to buy into. 

Now that you have the tools to become the fasest player on the field, make sure you stock up on all the gear you need for a successful season. Shop FTBL X CLR at eastbay.com and suit up in your team’s colors.

Want more advice from the pros? We’ve got you covered. Here are the Five Tools You Need To Make It In The League, straight from some of the top players.